Gloria Bravo

La Resistencia “ The Resistance”:  Opening Reception Fri.  Jan 10, 6-9pm

This series of portraits is inspired by “La Resistencia,” the young men and women on the front lines of Venezuela’s protest movement. Noble warriors. Mostly young men, many of whom have college degrees and career aspirations. They use homemade weapons and shields to battle the police, national guards and military on the streets of Caracas in the fierce struggle for the future of Venezuela.

50% of the proceeds from the sale of these artworks goes to the leaders of the opposition. It will be used to aid the Venezuelan humanitarian crisis.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, Jan 10, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: Jan 8 – Feb 1, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Iris Goldstein

RETROSPECTION  Coming in Late Nov-Dec. 2019—AFTERNOON RECEPTION WITH THE ARTIST, SUNDAY DEC. 15, 3-5PM

Iris Goldstein is a Chicago-based artist who has experimented with various sculpture formats.  She worked with hand tools to carve wood sculptures alluding to human forms, then moved on to work with plaster and other hardware-store materials allowing her a freedom of expression that belied the humdrum nature of her sculptural tools.

After working for a number of years creating painted plaster wall-relief sculptures, Goldstein more recently has experimented with using colored pencils on paper to see whether she can create a sense of three-dimensional space on paper.  This exhibit features a collection of drawings meant to mimic and elaborate on some of her sculptural ideas and is also a mini retrospective of the variety of her earlier work.

Exhibition dates: Wed. November 27  to Sat. December 21, 2019 . Opening Reception:  Friday Nov 29  6-9pm

Randi Shepard

BEYOND THE SURFACE  Coming in late Nov, Dec. 2019

ON DEC. 14, 6-9PM AT ARC   RANDI SHEPARD WILL HOST MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS! An evening of performances related to the themes of the printmaking work of Randi Shepard including: dance, music, theatre, and creative writing  PERFORMANCES START PROMPTLY AT 7PM

In the age of social media, people are experiencing more anxiety than ever, and more commonly being diagnosed with depression. How has the human experience changed? What motivates us in how we choose to spend our time?

Randi Shepard’s current work questions the value of our experiences and explores the theme of loneliness. The most valuable and fulfilling experiences are those where there is a strong connection with others. And, sometimes the loneliest feelings can occur not when we are alone, but when we are actually with others.

Just as these images change when you view them up close, and bring your attention to the flat shapes laying on the paper, we also need to step back, look beyond the surface and tap into the world that opens up when we let the stories, the personalities, and the feelings unfold.

Exhibition dates: Wed. November 27  to Sat. December 21, 2019 . Opening Reception:  Friday Nov 29  6-9pm

Clairan Ferrono

TORN THINGS    Coming in Late Nov-Dec. 2019

Clairan Ferrono says “Our nation, our world seems pretty ragged today. The Torn Things series was inspired by Tibetan prayer flags and Japanese and other indigenous peoples’ prayer trees. Each piece represents a prayer, a plea, an incantation for betterment of: climate, resources, political life, ”

Exhibition dates: Wed. November 27  to Sat. December 21, 2019 . Opening Reception:  Friday Nov 29  6-9pm

CONSCIOUSNESS OF ABSTRACTION: Beyond Literal Appearance– A Call for Entries Exhibit in March

CALL FOR ENTRIES JURIED BY ARTIST AND PROFESSOR DAVID REIF
Exhibit Dates MARCH 4 – MARCH 28 2020

CLICK HERE FOR APPLICATION FORM https://arcgallery.wufoo.com/forms/abstraction-at-arc-gallery/(application link may not work if viewed on phone–please copy and paste instead)

The terms “Abstraction” or “Abstract Art” are perhaps among the most common references describing particular way(s) of understanding and perceiving the cosmic and daily realities in which we find ourselves. (We might note, too, that the terms are often mis-applied as though they are necessarily in opposition to “Realism” or “Realistic Art”.) The truth is, however, that the abstract art “movements” of late 19th and early 20th century (Impression, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism, etc.) were driven by a passion to get closer to the complex realities of nature and human condition, not depart from them. Later, Minimalism, Neo-Dada, Geometric Abstraction, Conceptualism, Art Povera and other developments continue this “Big Bang” inquiry. Put simply, “Realism in Art” could no longer be described as an explicit fidelity to direct, observed, experience. This basic axiom remains, arguably, just as valid today: Reality is often far beyond simple, static appearance and can be highly counter-intuitive. Over the decades, the concepts of Relativity, Quantum Theory and the advent of photography – among many other ideas – have helped clarify, how and why this is so.
Abstraction, of course can be many different things, driven by many different principles and suppositions: some conscious, some intuitive. As an artist; What are yours? This exhibition is an invitation to submit, through the qualities and implications of your work, some conscious exploration of this question.

JUROR:    David Reif, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Univ. Wyoming. BFA, Painting, Drawing, Printmaking, The Art Institute of Chicago; MFA, Sculpture, Yale Univ.; Assoc. Professor, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.; Chair and Board, Wyoming Council for the Arts; Visiting Artist: Univ. of Northern Arizona, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, Univ. of Michigan, Colorado State Univ. Ft. Collins, Centenary College of Louisiana, Univ. of Houston, TX., Wayne State Univ. Detroit.
A Juried Exhibition at ARC Gallery, Chicago. Wed, March 4- to Sat, March 28th 2020

FEES: $40 for one to three images. $10 for each additional image (lower charge for students–High school or college students can pay a reduced fee of $25 per 3 entries with $10 for each additional entry (Please include copy of Student ID))
If paying by check, it must be received prior to jurying.

Jessica Gondek

Machine Reveries:  Opening Reception Fri.  Sept 6, 6-9pm

The primary focus of my work stems from an interest in technology, geometry, machine aesthetics, architecture and nature.  My work explores a dichotomous relationship between the hand and the machine. This series of recent drawings and paintings on exhibit at ARC Gallery & Educational Foundation examine gendered domestic machines from the early part of the twentieth century referencing trade catalogues and actual utilitarian objects.  These works hold in common a marriage of both traditional media and digitally mediated computer approaches intrinsic to the development of the images.  The mechanical forms within these compositions are transformed casting off their mundane function and asserting an animated physical presence and internal narrative connecting to the human condition.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, Sept 6, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: Aug 28 – Sept 21, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Joe Steiner

Joe Steiner @ 80: New Paintings:  Opening Reception Fri.  Sept 6, 6-9pm

“I am an observational figurative painter. I work exclusively from life and find inspiration in the urban environment around my studio. Many of my models are people from the neighborhood. I talk to my models while I paint and this helps me to connect with them. My goal as an artist is to open the door to my emotions and sharpen my eye as an observer.”

 

Opening Reception, Friday, July 26, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: Aug 28 – Sept 21, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Amy Zucker

TIME:  Opening Reception Fri.  Sept 6, 6-9pm

TIME “The indefinite continued process of existence and events in the past, present, and future.” (Merriam-Webster)

Aging is ever present. We resist with our choices and hope to make friends with the reality in the mirror and our minds. There can be judgment and disagreement in the choices we make to achieve youth or how we define healthy aging. The passage of TIME that defines aging however, is unavoidable, accepted and defined differently for us all.

I have long made art that relies heavily on my experiences as a nurse working with older adults and it has always served as a speaking point for me. I worked as a CNA in a nursing home when I was 16. I loved the residents’ white hair and faces, deep with wrinkles and lines. I am now middle aged and though I will always find them beautiful, I don’t want those features to be mine and I wonder about this. Irony? Hypocrisy? My mother lived to be 99 years old and in her mind she was forever young, always preferring to keep her age top secret. Even though she’d laugh with awareness after she’d say “I’m sweet sixteen!” youth and beauty would forever be desired by her.

My process has often been drawn to the act of sewing. It is both a memory and a companion to art making and nursing. Both my parents sewed. My mother sewed when she was young to make the clothes she could not afford but desired and later to adjust the clothes she could now buy but needed to tailor to her liking. My father was a surgeon and sewed tiny stitches both to mend due to an accident or to adjust for the patient’s desire. I have often felt the kinship of sewing to caregiving as an act of making repairs, closures and mending as we nurses help our patients seek out help to do the same.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, Sept 6, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: Aug 28 – Sept 21, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Call for Entries “His-ter’-ee-uh”

A juried exhibition in March 2019 at ARC. Click here for prospectus and application form.

New exhibit at ARC Gallery, March 2019, juried by artist Olive Stefanski. (NEW DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS! —Jan. 26th, 11:55 pm)

With this exhibition, we are calling for art that addresses structural sexism—in particular, women’s emotional realities, and how that emotional reality plays out in a national atmosphere of distrust about women’s stories, women’s rationality and women’s anger.

His-ter’-ee-uh: from the Greek word “hystera”, or womb—an organ that was thought to migrate erratically through a woman’s abdomen, searching for “fragrant smells”, much like “an animal within an animal”. (Aretaeus, Greek physician, 2nd century AD)

While the uterus has become more sedentary over the intervening years, it nevertheless continued to be blamed for women’s irrationality and emotional distress. In the 19th century, a time marked by both physical constraints (corsets) and psychological restrictions (confinement to womanly activities), widespread concerns about female hysteria resulted in numerous cures for misbehaving wombs. A popular treatment for hysteria at the time was clitoral stimulation administered by one’s physician.

Today, in the inevitable backlash to the “MeToo” moment, women once again are distrusted, disdained (and sometimes diagnosed) for an emotionality that threatens the status quo. Women’s bodies continue to be the ground around which much of the conflict revolves. Strangely enough (as we saw in recent Supreme Court hearings) some of the hysteria around these events now seems to also emanate from men, which suggests the need for a new metaphor to explain the cause of women’s rage.

application form and prospectus: https://arcgallery.wufoo.com/forms/ahistereeuha/