Jessica Gondek

Machine Reveries:  Opening Reception Fri.  Sept 6, 6-9pm

The primary focus of my work stems from an interest in technology, geometry, machine aesthetics, architecture and nature.  My work explores a dichotomous relationship between the hand and the machine. This series of recent drawings and paintings on exhibit at ARC Gallery & Educational Foundation examine gendered domestic machines from the early part of the twentieth century referencing trade catalogues and actual utilitarian objects.  These works hold in common a marriage of both traditional media and digitally mediated computer approaches intrinsic to the development of the images.  The mechanical forms within these compositions are transformed casting off their mundane function and asserting an animated physical presence and internal narrative connecting to the human condition.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, Sept 6, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: Aug 28 – Sept 21, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Joe Steiner

Joe Steiner @ 80: New Paintings:  Opening Reception Fri.  Sept 6, 6-9pm

“I am an observational figurative painter. I work exclusively from life and find inspiration in the urban environment around my studio. Many of my models are people from the neighborhood. I talk to my models while I paint and this helps me to connect with them. My goal as an artist is to open the door to my emotions and sharpen my eye as an observer.”

 

Opening Reception, Friday, July 26, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: Aug 28 – Sept 21, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Amy Zucker

TIME:  Opening Reception Fri.  Sept 6, 6-9pm

TIME “The indefinite continued process of existence and events in the past, present, and future.” (Merriam-Webster)

Aging is ever present. We resist with our choices and hope to make friends with the reality in the mirror and our minds. There can be judgment and disagreement in the choices we make to achieve youth or how we define healthy aging. The passage of TIME that defines aging however, is unavoidable, accepted and defined differently for us all.

I have long made art that relies heavily on my experiences as a nurse working with older adults and it has always served as a speaking point for me. I worked as a CNA in a nursing home when I was 16. I loved the residents’ white hair and faces, deep with wrinkles and lines. I am now middle aged and though I will always find them beautiful, I don’t want those features to be mine and I wonder about this. Irony? Hypocrisy? My mother lived to be 99 years old and in her mind she was forever young, always preferring to keep her age top secret. Even though she’d laugh with awareness after she’d say “I’m sweet sixteen!” youth and beauty would forever be desired by her.

My process has often been drawn to the act of sewing. It is both a memory and a companion to art making and nursing. Both my parents sewed. My mother sewed when she was young to make the clothes she could not afford but desired and later to adjust the clothes she could now buy but needed to tailor to her liking. My father was a surgeon and sewed tiny stitches both to mend due to an accident or to adjust for the patient’s desire. I have often felt the kinship of sewing to caregiving as an act of making repairs, closures and mending as we nurses help our patients seek out help to do the same.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, Sept 6, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: Aug 28 – Sept 21, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

EMERGING– A Call for Entries Exhibit in November

Call for Entries for EMERGING, an exhibition at ARC in November 2019.  Click below for the application form (if you are reading this on a phone, you might need to go to a computer or tablet for the link to work):

https://arcgallery.wufoo.com/forms/emerginga-juried-exhibition-at-arc-in-octnov/

Many artists ‘begin’ their careers as artists not only in their early twenties but in later decades and for a wide variety of reasons—rediscovery of a long suppressed drive, delayed ability to focus on creating, a return to art school later in life, or a moment of enlightenment.This exhibition is calling for EMERGING artists of all ages and will feature the diversity of work that they are currently creating. All media will be considered including film/video/new media, mixed media/multi-disciplinary, installation and performance.

Juror: Laura Rudolph Cloud, Associate Professor, Michigan State University, Department of Art, Art History and Design. Sculpture Coordinator

Esther Charbit

Eclecticity:  Opening Reception Fri.  July 26, 6-9pm

My body of work is eclectic. Some of the pieces are abstract, some are figurative, and some are very decorative; but all have surface texture created by collaged papers and built-up paint.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, July 26, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: July 24 – Aug 17, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Sarah Barnhart Fields

FLUID THINGS:  Opening Reception Fri.  July 26, 6-9pm

I work to reach that magic place I knew as a child, where “reality” disappears and all things are possible.

My work is a way of finding out who I am. To quote Kurt Vonnegut; “I make art to experience becoming – to find out what’s inside me – to make my soul grow.” Each piece tells me more about myself. It’s a more honest statement about who I am and my relationship to the world than I can make in any other way.

I am a sculptor whose raw materials are scrap metal, wood and other materials I find. I manipulate, add and subtract until the piece speaks to me, tells me it is finished and I see the “soul” of the work. I live and work in the country & have access to old tools and parts of farm equipment. These materials speak of death and renewal.

Being an artist for me is a process of lifelong learning, you are never done. Each piece is perpetual renewal. It’s always for the first time.

Opening Reception, Friday, July 26, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: July 24 – Aug 17, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm

Casey Sills

QUERENCIA:  Opening Reception Fri.  July 26, 6-9pm

Querencia: Spanish, a metaphysical concept, a place where one draws strength and is restored. In bullfighting, it is the part of the arena the bull seeks and chooses to take his stand, from this position he finds strength and calm.

These photographs are for me, querencias. They are places of meditation, sanctums in whose forms I find a presence that restores and gives peace. I drive backroads, through countryside, towns, and cities, looking to find, see, and photograph those places that are imbued with presence. I make documentary photographs that are both concrete and abstract. In my photographs there is a dialogue between the natural color of the living landscape and the manmade color of structures as they have been modified by conditions and time. My photographs are an aesthetic and topographic archaeology of a site; they are simultaneously a celebration of light gracing form, and a way of seeing which reveals the extraordinary in the ordinary. Photographic accuracy of light and color renders the subtle place where the fortuitous occurs and the marvelous emerges. The photograph captures the chemistry of an instant that both defines, and is redefined by the printed image. A sense of place, an image, a print, a querencia.

Opening Reception, Friday, July 26, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: July 24 – Aug 17, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Frayed: Fiber Beyond Craft

JUROR: Jade YumangOpening Reception Fri.  June 28, 6-9pm 

Exhibiting artists chosen by juror:

Aviva Alter – Theo Bignon – Caroline Covington – Madison Creech. – Micah Dillman – Sophia Karina English – Audrey Goldstein  – Peg Grady – Mille Guldbeck – Danielle Anastasia Lasker – JeeYeun Lee – Joanne Luongo – Yvonne Martinez – Katie Mongoven – Em Racine – Daniela Triana – Jacob Zhefu Wan – Hope Wang – Mia Weiner – Chris Williford – Alex Younger


Fiber works — from embroidery, stitching and sewing, to weaving and felting— have, throughout history, been relegated to the genre of craft and to ‘women’s work.’ Since the late sixties and early seventies, however, the women’s movement has broken through that pigeonhole, as many talented artists turned to Fiber as a form of expression that extended way beyond Craft. ARC’s exhibition views fiber as a seminal aspect of expression–we look to further “fray” the boundaries of this evocative medium.
 

Fiber art now goes beyond the worn-out craft vs. art debate and is a lot more integrated into modes of making work. The potential of using techniques that we habitually encounter on our daily lives primarily through touch then highlighting that fundamental affect into transformative work is robust and boundless.

Subsequently, fiber art is a conduit that is adapted to grasp evolving implications able to tackle subjects including but not limited to personal narratives, formal abstractions, body works, and political underpinnings. Its conceptual weight is the ability to upend ubiquitous techniques and materials to craft different perspectives and/or break its expectations.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, June 28, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: June 26 – July 20, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Cheri Reif Naselli

INTERIOR CONVERSATIONS:  Opening Reception Fri.  May 31, 6-9pm

Click here for a link to an article about Naselli in the Fat Canary Journal

This work, my work, is a glimpse into an interior life and ongoing conversations – wondering, searching, thinking, feeling, collecting, solving, hoping, listening, wandering, finding, questioning, more thinking, learning, panicking, walking, seeing, forever searching, visual thinking on paper and in space – resulting in this exhibition.

 

Opening Reception, Friday, May 31, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: May 29 – June 22, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm  

Chiyeko Yuki

Here’s to Life:  Opening Reception Fri.  May 31, 6-9pm

Spring is here again after the long, severe winter. The seasons come around. Eight years have passed since the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami took away the lives of more than 18,000 people and swept away everyday life along the coasts.

After the terrible tsunami,  a single pine tree, which had once been a part of a large forest, was the only tree left standing. It was called “the miracle pine” and it initially survived the summer heat, the blowing seawater winds, and the cold snow. It encouraged people and gave them hope to survive. Its roots, however, had been fatally exposed to seawater and it finally died one year after the tsunami. People started to work on a big project to apply special treatments to keep the wood from decaying before restoring it to its original site. By using cloning technology, efforts have been made to create offspring of this miracle pine. It has become a symbol of the recovery and survival efforts of the people in this region.

I have come to the realization that there is something we must hand down to later generations and to the future world. On the exact day of the Big Tsunami I was in bed, in the hospital after surgery. However, I am now here and I am able to enjoy my art and my life again. These small pieces of art are my everyday “journals”. They are my way of life shown in Light and Shadow.

I am writing this on Mother’s Day and I feel a sense of gratitude. My 98-year-old mother helps me cut the paper for my art. I feel thankful for my family and my friends. I am also grateful to the ARC artists who continue to encourage me to make art.

Opening Reception, Friday, May 31, 6:00-9:00pm

  • Exhibition dates: May 29 – June 22, 2019 
  • Gallery hours: Wed – Sat 12-6 pm,  Sun 12-4 pm